Traditional recipes

Arctic roll

Arctic roll


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Put the yolks with a cup of sugar in a saucepan. Let it cool. Keep on low heat, stirring constantly with a fork, until the sugar melts. Mix the whipped cream with the cream and sugar until it becomes fluffy and bound. We pass the bananas well. Put the vanilla and bananas in the yolk mixture and mix well then incorporate the whipped cream, lightly.


The form is left to the possibilities and imagination of everyone. I chose to cut two pots, one of 1 liter, the other of half, then I poured the mixture (you can use a casserole), and finally I put everything cold. In the small one I put bars in the middle March. That after he had already strengthened a little. I put it in the freezer overnight.

For the pandispan sheet I separated the egg whites from the yolks. I beat the egg whites with a whisk, gradually adding the sugar and beating until the crystals melt. I incorporated the yolks and flour mixed with baking powder, mixing lightly. I poured the mixture into an 18/20 cm tray in which I put baking paper greased with butter. Bake in the preheated oven over medium heat for 15-20 minutes. I took it out on a damp towel and rolled it with paper. I let it cool.

I took the ice cream out of the freezer and cut the edge of the pet with scissors and detached it from the ice cream.

I put the jam in a kettle, over low heat, adding a little water to dilute it. With a silicone brush I greased the pandispan with some jam. I didn't get enough (in length) to wear the big roll so I put the small one and joined the ends (I cut a little because it was too much).

I put the wafer sheets glued together, I greased them with hot jam, I left them for 1 minute and I put the big roll. I ran, dressing her completely.

I played with a little chocolate on top.


Jane Garvey apologizes after calling Arctic Roll a & # 39low-level pudding & # 39

Once described as tasting of “frozen carpet” by food writer Nigel Slater, the Arctic Roll has long divided households.

Served up in British homes throughout the seventies and eighties, the pudding was seen as a cost-saving sweet.

But the host of Woman’s Hour, Jane Garvey, came under criticism for her own dismal view of the ice-cream tube covered in sponge and jam.

Garvey was forced to apologize to Radio 4 listeners before the end of her show on Tuesday after she called the Arctic Roll a “low-level pudding”.

The host had been in discussion with comedian Jayde Adams, who told listeners about how when she was impersonating singer Adele she used to change the lyrics to the chorus of her song Skyfall to & quotTrifle, crumble and Arctic Roll & quot.

Garvey, 55, replied: & quotAnything with Arctic roll is funny. It's a real .. and I don't mean to be offensive to the manufacturers or indeed to regular users of Arctic Roll but it's a low-level pudding.

& quotWhen we had it at home and we did, I was always very disgruntled by it. & quot

The Arctic Roll was first sold in Britain just over 50 years ago and quickly became a popular treat but sales slumped during the 1990s, with Birds Eye dropping the product in 1997.

It had been invented in the 1950s by Dr Ernest Velden, a Czechoslovakian lawyer who had fled the Nazis in 1939 and set up an ice cream factory the following year in Eastbourne. It later helped earn him the OBE in 1983.

Following Garvey’s comments, fans of the sweet began sending pictures into Woman’s Hour of Arctic Roll which she said was & quotin its own way very nice & quot.

But by the end of the program listeners refused to let Garvey off the hook branding her opinion as “snobby”.

Garvey added: & quotBrief mention in the apology corner to the regular purchasers and people who enjoy Arctic Roll.

“I can’t believe how presumptuous and snobby your presenter sounded, said one listener.

& quotTo be honest with you, I don't like Arctic Roll. I didn’t like it in the seventies, I don’t like it now but I’m certainly not snobby about it.

The thing was about Arctic Roll was the jam, there was hardly any jam on the sponge and what was the point of it?

“I do apologize if you are a big, big fan of Arctic Roll.

“Other listeners have pointed out that you can make your own. Why would you make your own I don’t know? ”

Signing off for the day Garvey said that on her next show she will be discussing sourdough in depth and added: “I guess that means that in a few weeks time I will be hand wrestling my very own arctic roll here in the studio for your delight. . ”


Why has the Arctic become so strategic?

"The Arctic in many ways is the newest emerging market in the world," said Rockford Weitz, a professor of practice and director of the Maritime Studies program at The Fletcher School at Tufts University.

"Previously because of the harsh conditions and the ice, no humans really spent much time in the Arctic. And that started changing about 15 years ago as the Arctic sea ice started to melt. And so all of a sudden there's more accessibility for oil, natural gas minerals, "Weitz told Euronews.

Sea ice breaks apart by the passing of the Finnish icebreaker MSV Nordica as it traverses the Northwest Passage through the Victoria Strait in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago David Goldman / AP

"All the countries are interested in resource extraction. I would just say it's a difference of degree."

"So the Russians have a little bit more interest in the extraction of natural gas and minerals and crude oil than the other countries do but those countries still do have that interest."

"Canadians and the Nordic countries and the U.S. under the Biden administration are really focused on climate change and environmental protection and sustainability," the Weitz said.

Even non-Arctic countries are showing a growing interest in the region.

China’s interest is mainly to diversify its energy supply, Weitz said, “going through the Bering strait and be able to extract both Norwegian and Russian natural gas and import it through the Arctic and the North Pacific to avoid the Suez Canal and the Malacca straits. "

"The near-Arctic nations are usually interested in the economic opportunities, though some of the European countries including France and the UK are interested in the military piece of it as well."

The Arctic's strategic importance is inversely proportional to its population.

"It's a very large space and there aren't many people. Only 4.2 million people live north of the Arctic circle," Weitz said.


Ball deodorants and slow-acting poisons in their composition. What are the most harmful products

The results of the study are worrying: 77% of the roll-on deodorants analyzed contain endocrine disruptors and allergens.

29% of the analyzed products contain BHT a substance with carcinogenic potential, and 23% of the analyzed products contain aluminum hydrochloride a substance with toxic potential on the brain.

Choosing a cosmetic or personal care product is no longer so easy to do, due to the multitude of chemical ingredients used in the manufacture of these products, but also the aspects related to labeling, corroborated and with some shortcomings of a legislative nature. .

Synthetic fragrances can have over 200 ingredients in their composition and contain large amounts of toxins and chemicals not displayed. Often, synthetic perfumes contain phthalates that have the role of making the smell persistent and that penetrate the skin very quickly, significantly increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Also, the synthetic perfume causes skin irritations, dermatitis, migraines, dizziness, violent cough. , hyperpigmentation.

Triclosan is an antifungal and antibacterial substance, found in 7% of the analyzed products, which can change the level of testosterone in a woman's body, causing male features (increased muscle mass, increased hair in areas such as face, hands, chest, etc.) , and in the case of men to increase the level of estrogen in the body, causing physical or mental sensitivities, nervousness and irritability. At the same time, it can increase resistance to bacteria and is potentially carcinogenic. The use of triclosan in cosmetics was restricted by the European Commission in 2014.

Adidas 24h Deo Stick Pure Game 0% alcohols for men (Made in Monaco) and Nectar of Beauty 24h for women (Made in France) contain triclosan.

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) (present in 29% of the analyzed products) is a chemical compound used as an antioxidant in cosmetics, with the role of preventing or slowing down the damage of cosmetics or personal care products, damage due to chemical reactions with oxygen. BHT can cause damage to the liver in high concentrations and the appearance of tumors, can cause asthma and behavioral problems in children, is allergenic to the skin and eyes and is also potentially carcinogenic and possibly disruptive of the endocrine system.

Roll on deodorants for men in which BHT is found:

Adidas 24h Deo Stick Pure Game 0% alcohol (Made in Monaco)

Dove Men + Care Cool Fresh% Alcohol 48h (Made in Russia)

Intesa Pour Homme Deodorant Freschezza Delicata Stick No alcohol Ylang-Ylong (Italy)

Malitia Profumo D’Instesa Uomo Vetyvet (Made in Italy)

Rexona Men MotionSense Invisible Black + White 48h (Made in Russia).

Roll on deodorants for women in which BHT is found:

Adidas 6 in 1 Cool & 48h Anti-Perspirant Care (Made in Spain).

Bionsen Caringtouch Gentle & Soothing 24h (Made in San Marino)

Dove natural touch dead sea minerals 48h (Made in Russia)

Nivea Invisible for Black & White 48h (Made in Germany).

Formaldehyde-releasing preservatives (DMDM Hydantoin, Imidazolidinyl urea) are found in 10% of the analyzed products. These ingredients slowly but steadily release small amounts of formaldehyde, a carcinogenic chemical. The toxic effects of these preservatives are multiple: contact dermatitis, joint pain, allergies, depression, headache, chest pain, ear infections, chronic fatigue, dizziness, insomnia.

Roll on deodorants for men in which DMDM ​​Hydantoin is found:

STR 8 Body Refresh Adventure 24h (Made in France).

Roll-on men's deodorants containing Imidazolidinyl urea:

Up Deo Stick for Men Lotus 24h (Made in Romania).

Unisex roll on deodorants containing Imidazolidinyl urea:

Deo Stick Activ Lotus 24h (Made in Romania).

Siloxanes (cyclopentasiloxane, cyclomethicones) are silicone-based ingredients and are used in the cosmetics industry to soften, smooth and moisturize, which is why they are found in moisturizers, to facilitate the sliding of solid deodorants on the skin. They are suspected of causing disorders of the endocrine, immune and reproductive systems. They are harmful to the environment.

Cyclopentasiloxane (present in 13% of the analyzed products).

Cyclopentasiloxane roll-on men's deodorants:

Dove Men + Care Cool Fresh% Alcohol 48h (Made in Russia)

Gillette Endurance High Performance Arctic Ice 48h (Made in UK)

Rexona Men MotionSense Invisible Black + White 48h (Made in Russia)

Cyclopentasiloxane roll-on deodorants for women:

Dove natural touch dead sea minerals 48h (Made in Russia)

Cyclomethicone (exists in 10% of the analyzed products)

Cyclomethicone roll on deodorants for men:

Mennen Speed ​​Stick Gel 48h (Made in Poland)

Roll on deodorants for women in which Cyclomethicone is found:

Lady Speed ​​Stick Pro 5 in 1 48h (Made in Poland)

Nivea Invisible for Black & White 48h (Made in Germany)

Aluminum hydrochloride (present in 23% of the analyzed products) is an ingredient with an antiperspirant, astringent and deodorant role. Aluminum enters the body through skin lesions and can cause toxic effects on the liver, kidneys, bones or brain.
That is why the French Agency for Health Safety (Afssaps) recommends that cosmetics manufacturers reduce the amount of aluminum in deodorants and antiperspirants to 0.6%.

Roll-on men's deodorants containing Aluminum Hydrochloride:

Garnier Men 72h (Made in France)

Men Activ Science Nonstop 48h (Made in France)

STR 8 Body Refresh Adventure 24h (Made in France).

Roll on deodorants for women in which Aluminum Hydrochloride is found:

Invisible Mineral Garnier Clear Original 48h (Made in Poland)

Lycia Original 48h (Made in Italy)

Nectar of Beauty 24h (Carrefour) (Made in France).

Rexona Motion Sense Aloe Vera 48h (Made in the UK)

Unfortunately, modern man is surrounded by 'slow-acting poisons', which the body of adults, and especially children, absorb through the airways, skin, even the digestive tract, gradually becoming ill and often (…) Choosing a deodorant is not as easy as it sounds at first glance. First of all, we need to consider who this type of product is intended for, pregnant women and the elderly being the most vulnerable consumers of such products. (…) Deodorants should be treated with the utmost care, especially by the Ministry. Health, which should perform regular checks and testing of cosmetics.


Ball deodorants and slow-acting poisons in their composition. What are the most harmful products

The results of the study are worrying: 77% of the roll-on deodorants analyzed contain endocrine disruptors and allergens.

29% of the analyzed products contain BHT a substance with carcinogenic potential, and 23% of the analyzed products contain aluminum hydrochloride a substance with potentially toxic to the brain.

Choosing a cosmetic or personal care product is no longer so easy to do, due to the multitude of chemical ingredients used in the manufacture of these products, but also the aspects related to labeling, corroborated and with some shortcomings of a legislative nature. .

Synthetic fragrances can have over 200 ingredients in their composition and contain large amounts of toxins and chemicals not displayed. Often, synthetic perfumes contain phthalates that have the role of making the smell persistent and that penetrate the skin very quickly, significantly increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Also, the synthetic perfume causes skin irritations, dermatitis, migraines, dizziness, violent cough. , hyperpigmentation.

Triclosan is an antifungal and antibacterial substance, found in 7% of the analyzed products, which can change the level of testosterone in a woman's body, causing male features (increased muscle mass, increased hair in areas such as face, hands, chest, etc.) , and in the case of men to increase the level of estrogen in the body, causing physical or mental sensitivities, nervousness and irritability. At the same time, it can increase resistance to bacteria and is potentially carcinogenic. The use of triclosan in cosmetics was restricted by the European Commission in 2014.

Adidas 24h Deo Stick Pure Game 0% alcohols for men (Made in Monaco) and Nectar of Beauty 24h for women (Made in France) contain triclosan.

BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) (present in 29% of the analyzed products) is a chemical compound used as an antioxidant in cosmetics, with the role of preventing or slowing down the damage of cosmetics or personal care products, damage due to chemical reactions with oxygen. BHT can cause damage to the liver in high concentrations and the appearance of tumors, can cause asthma and behavioral problems in children, is allergenic to the skin and eyes and is also potentially carcinogenic and possibly disruptive of the endocrine system.

Roll on deodorants for men in which BHT is found:

Adidas 24h Deo Stick Pure Game 0% alcohol (Made in Monaco)

Dove Men + Care Cool Fresh% Alcohol 48h (Made in Russia)

Intesa Pour Homme Deodorant Freschezza Delicata Stick No alcohol Ylang-Ylong (Italy)

Malitia Profumo D’Instesa Uomo Vetyvet (Made in Italy)

Rexona Men MotionSense Invisible Black + White 48h (Made in Russia).

Roll on deodorants for women in which BHT is found:

Adidas 6 in 1 Cool & 48h Anti-Perspirant Care (Made in Spain).

Bionsen Caringtouch Gentle & Soothing 24h (Made in San Marino)

Dove natural touch dead sea minerals 48h (Made in Russia)

Nivea Invisible for Black & White 48h (Made in Germany).

Formaldehyde-releasing preservatives (DMDM Hydantoin, Imidazolidinyl urea) are found in 10% of the analyzed products. These ingredients slowly but steadily release small amounts of formaldehyde, carcinogenic chemicals. The toxic effects of these preservatives are multiple: contact dermatitis, joint pain, allergies, depression, headache, chest pain, ear infections, chronic fatigue, dizziness, insomnia.

Roll on deodorants for men in which DMDM ​​Hydantoin is found:

STR 8 Body Refresh Adventure 24h (Made in France).

Roll-on men's deodorants containing Imidazolidinyl urea:

Up Deo Stick for Men Lotus 24h (Made in Romania).

Unisex roll on deodorants containing Imidazolidinyl urea:

Deo Stick Activ Lotus 24h (Made in Romania).

Siloxanes (cyclopentasiloxane, cyclomethicones) are silicone-based ingredients and are used in the cosmetics industry to soften, smooth and moisturize, which is why they are found in moisturizers, to facilitate the sliding of solid deodorants on the skin. They are suspected of causing disorders of the endocrine, immune and reproductive systems. They are harmful to the environment.

Cyclopentasiloxane (present in 13% of the analyzed products).

Cyclopentasiloxane roll-on men's deodorants:

Dove Men + Care Cool Fresh% Alcohol 48h (Made in Russia)

Gillette Endurance High Performance Arctic Ice 48h (Made in UK)

Rexona Men MotionSense Invisible Black + White 48h (Made in Russia)

Cyclopentasiloxane roll-on deodorants for women:

Dove natural touch dead sea minerals 48h (Made in Russia)

Cyclomethicone (exists in 10% of the analyzed products)

Cyclomethicone roll on deodorants for men:

Mennen Speed ​​Stick Gel 48h (Made in Poland)

Roll on deodorants for women in which Cyclomethicone is found:

Lady Speed ​​Stick Pro 5 in 1 48h (Made in Poland)

Nivea Invisible for Black & White 48h (Made in Germany)

Aluminum hydrochloride (present in 23% of the analyzed products) is an ingredient with an antiperspirant, astringent and deodorant role. Aluminum enters the body through skin lesions and can cause toxic effects on the liver, kidneys, bones or brain.
That is why the French Agency for Health Safety (Afssaps) recommends that cosmetics manufacturers reduce the amount of aluminum in deodorants and antiperspirants to 0.6%.

Roll on deodorants for men in which Aluminum Hydrochloride is found:

Garnier Men 72h (Made in France)

Men Activ Science Nonstop 48h (Made in France)

STR 8 Body Refresh Adventure 24h (Made in France).

Roll on deodorants for women in which Aluminum Hydrochloride is found:

Invisible Mineral Garnier Clear Original 48h (Made in Poland)

Lycia Original 48h (Made in Italy)

Nectar of Beauty 24h (Carrefour) (Made in France).

Rexona Motion Sense Aloe Vera 48h (Made in the UK)

Unfortunately, modern man is surrounded by 'slow-acting poisons', which the body of adults, and especially children, absorb through the airways, skin, even the digestive tract, gradually becoming ill and often (…) Choosing a deodorant is not as easy as it sounds at first glance. First of all, we need to consider who this type of product is intended for, pregnant women and the elderly being the most vulnerable consumers of such products. (…) Deodorants should be treated with the utmost care, especially by the Ministry. Health, which should perform regular checks and testing of cosmetics.


Kim Joy’s recipe for autumnal arctic roll

T his isn’t as tricky as it looks. Ideally your chocolate swiss roll won’t crack, but if it does, the ganache will cover up any flaws. Decorate the top however you like, to create your own autumnal scene.

For the cake:
5 medium eggs
125g caster sugar
1 tsp vanilla bean paste
80g plain flour
35g cocoa powder
10g boiling water

For the filling:
About 400g ice cream (any flavor you like)
Strawberry jam

For the ganache:
200g dark chocolate
200g double cream

To decorate:
Crumbled walnuts, fresh fruit (blueberries, blackberries and raspberries work well), biscuits and fondant leaf cutouts (both optional)

Spoon softened ice cream into a rough log shape (about 18-20cm long) on ​​greaseproof paper. Lift the sides over, then twist the ends together. Freeze until solid. Meanwhile, prepare decorations for the top of the roll. I made a squirrel biscuit and some painted fondant autumn leaves.

Heat the oven to 220C (200C fan) / 425F / gas mark 7. Grease and line a 10 x 15in swiss roll tin (try to have the greaseproof paper overhanging, so it’s easy to lift out).

Make the cake: whisk together the eggs and sugar on high speed for seven minutes. Slow the mixer and add the vanilla just before the end. Sieve in the flour and cocoa. Gently fold to combine. Add the water and fold in again.

Spoon into the prepared tin, and smooth. Bake for 8-13 minutes, or until slightly springy on top.

When baked, lift from the tin (using the greaseproof paper handles to help) and place on a wire rack. Leave for five minutes, then roll up loosely while still warm and leave to cool in this rolled-up shape. Leave the baking paper on. Then gently unroll and spread with strawberry jam. Remove the ice-cream roll from the freezer, peel off the greaseproof paper, and place the ice cream on the end of the cake roll. Roll up the cake to fully encase the ice cream, peeling off the baking paper as you go along. Place back in the freezer while you make the ganache topping.

Finely chop the chocolate and place in a heatproof glass bowl. Pour the cream into a small pan. Heat on low, until just starting to bubble (don’t boil!). Pour to cover the chocolate. Leave for two minutes, then stir until all the chocolate has melted. Leave to cool until spreadable, but not too thick.

Take the roll out of the freezer, then spread the ganache all over it. Once set, use a sharp knife to neaten up the ends of the roll. Decorate the top as desired.

Serve straight away, or tightly wrap in clingfilm and return to the freezer.


Arctic roll - Recipes

A British dessert like a jelly roll, but with ice cream instead of jelly.

Freebase (0.00 / 0 votes) Rate this definition:

An Arctic roll is a British dessert made of vanilla ice cream wrapped in a thin layer of sponge cake to form a roll, with a layer of raspberry flavored sauce between the sponge and the ice cream. The dessert was invented in the 1950s by a Czech lawyer, Ernest Velden, who had emigrated to England in 1939. He set up a factory in Eastbourne producing Arctic Roll in 1958, and the dessert quickly became very popular. During the 1980s more than 25 miles of Birds Eye Arctic Roll were sold each month. However, sales slumped during the 1990s and eventually the manufacturer of Arctic Roll, Birds Eye, stopped producing the dessert. The 2008 economic downturn saw the reappearance of Arctic Roll as consumers increasingly looked for low-cost foods. While some consumers view the Arctic Roll as comfort food, others view it as old fashioned and the food writer Nigel Slater has even described it as tasting of "frozen carpet". Nonetheless, Birds Eye reported “overwhelming consumer demand” for the dessert. Indeed, from when Birds Eye started marketing Arctic Rolls again in December 2008 until April 2009, sales of the product were estimated at £ 3.5 million, or 3 million boxes. Commentators suggest that aside from Arctic Roll’s low price, many consumers buy the dessert out of feelings of nostalgia. A number of UK supermarkets sell their own brand versions of Arctic Roll, both chocolate and raspberry variants, and did so even when Birds Eye were not marketing the product.


For the Swiss roll

Preheat your oven to 200C / 180C Fan / Gas 6 and line a Swiss roll tin, 22x32cm / 8½x13in or similar, with baking parchment. Oil this very lightly with sunflower oil.

Put the ice cream in a large bowl and beat it with a rolling pin or something similar until soft enough to mold. Put it on a piece of baking parchment and shape it into a thin sausage 25–30cm / 10-12in long and about 5cm / 2in in diameter. Wrap in the parchment and put in the freezer until solid.

To make the Swiss roll, use an electric whisk or a mixer with a whisk attachment to whisk the eggs and sugar together for several minutes until pale, moussey and almost tripled in volume. The mixture should ‘hold a trail’ when the whisk is removed. Sift the flour over the egg mixture and fold it in lightly. Fold in one tablespoon of warm water.

Pour the mixture into the prepared tin and smooth it out so that it reaches the corners. Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until golden-brown and just firm to the touch.

Cut a sheet of parchment slightly larger than the Swiss roll tin and lay it on your work surface. Sprinkle the parchment with sugar. Tip the cooked sponge onto the parchment, base upwards. Carefully peel the parchment from the base of the sponge. Leave to cool completely.

To assemble the roll, first trim the two long sides of the sponge into neat, straight lines. Spread the jam over the sponge, leaving a 2cm / gapin gap at each short edge and a 4cm / 1½in gap along one of the long edges.

Unwrap the ice cream and place it lengthways across the sponge, close to the jammy edge. Use the parchment to help you roll the sponge around the ice cream. Use a bread knife to neatly trim each end of the roll. Place on a plate and serve straight away, in thick slices. You can wrap any uneaten roll and return it to the freezer. Take it out and let it stand for a few minutes so the sponge can soften slightly, before slicing again.


Method

To make the filling, roughly crush the raspberries with a fork and stir in the lemon juice and zest. Ripple the raspberry mixture through the ice cream. Roll into a log shape, wrap with baking paper and transfer to the freezer to set.

To make the sponge, preheat the oven to 200C / 180C Fan / Gas 6 and line a 22cmx32cm baking tray or Swiss roll tin with baking paper. Whisk the eggs, vanilla and sugar in a bowl with an electric whisk until pale and the mixture leaves a trail when the whisk is removed. Fold the flour in lightly. Tip into the baking tray and smooth the surface so it is flat and reaches all the corners. Cook for 10–15 minutes until golden and just firm to the touch. Cover with a cloth and keep warm.

Warm the raspberry jam in a small saucepan. Spread the jam over the sponge and leave to cool for a minute or two on baking paper. Place the ice cream lengthwise down one side of the sponge and roll up using the baking paper to help you. Leave in the freezer until ready to slice.

To make the raspberry sauce, place all the ingredients into a small saucepan and cook for 3–5 minutes until the raspberries are slightly breaking down.

Serve slices of the arctic roll with the raspberry sauce and fresh raspberries.

Recipe Tips

You could use ready-made raspberry ripple ice cream in this recipe instead of making your own. Allow to soften just enough to roll into a log and freeze until ready to assemble.


How dare food snobs give Arctic Roll the cold shoulder

Just when you think it is safe to rummage through the deep freezer with a shaking hand to find your favorite comforting trash pudding - hopefully something rich in E numbers, devoid of fresh fruit and pumped full of synthetic cream - a food snob comes along to sneer at your appalling taste and your lack of finesse.

Last week it was BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour presenter Jane Garvey, when she scandalously claimed that the Arctic Roll was a ‘low-level pudding’. Gasp.

Low level? Hark at her. That’s a terrible thing to say about an innocent sponge filled with ice cream and raspberry sauce!

And the broadcaster soon found herself in a jam when Arctic Roll fans started complaining in their droves about her pudding-based elitism and forced the dessert rat into an apology.

Jan Moir reflected on a selection of retro puddings, after Jane Garvey claimed Arctic Roll (pictured) is a & # 8216low-level pudding & # 8217

‘I do apologize if you’re a big, big fan of Arctic Roll,’ she sniffed.

While she hadn’t meant to offend anyone, she added: ‘I’ll be honest with you, I don’t like Arctic Roll.’

To be fair, she is not alone. The food writer and author Nigel Slater once likened the 1970s family favorite to a 'frozen carpet' that tasted like 'cold cardboard' - just a 'tube of vanilla ice-cream wrapped by wet sponge and ring of red jam so thin it could have been drawn on with an architect's pen '.

Is it really that bad? Arctic Roll was high on the hit list of factory-made puddings that reached the height of their popularity in the 1970s - because well, we just didn’t know any better.

Today, it is up there on the foodie podium of odium, alongside Angel Delight, Viennetta, Neapolitan Ice Cream Bricks and Heinz Steamed Puddings in tins. They barely had a vitamin or a natural element between them. Back then it wasn’t the Ready Brek that made us kiddies glow in the dark, it was what we had for pud.

But is Arctic Roll so terrible? Can anything so innocently formed of ice cream, sponge and fruit be so bad? I decided to make one from scratch to get to the jammy heart of the matter and restore some dignity to this most maligned of frozen desserts.

I don’t have to look far to find a recipe — there is one prominently displayed on the BBC’s Good Food website. Jane must be furious are they trolling her?

I assemble all the ingredients — including my last, precious tattered half-bag of plain flour — before realising I am expected to make the ice cream and the jam from scratch. What? They’ve got to be kidding.

Begrudgingly, I agree. But I won’t be spending £10 on a vanilla pod as instructed — a splash of bottled essence will have to do. Food snob Jane won’t approve.

Jan who made her own Arctic roll, said the 1970s family favourite tastes pretty nice. Pictured: Angel Delight

Start by whisking eggs, icing sugar, vanilla and double cream to make the ice cream. Freeze it in a loaf tin for an hour, then mould into a log shape before freezing for another two hours. Oh my goodness. It tastes like the Wall’s Ice Cream of my childhood — retro heaven.

I make the jam. The jam boils into an inedible strawberry magma. To my jam shame, I use some from a jar instead. I bake the sponge, roll it up tightly in parchment and wait.

To assemble: Unwrap the Swiss roll, spread with jam, slap in the ice cream cylinder, roll it all up and stick it back in the freezer.

I want to be honest here. I have hopelessly over jammed and under-creamed my Arctic Roll. It looks like a limb stump from The Red Wedding scene in Game Of Thrones. It looks … hideous. I sprinkle some caster sugar on top and hope for the best.

How does it taste? Pretty nice, despite the disparagers. And not a whiff of wet cardboard in sight — it would be fun to make with children. Arctic Roll may not be the most sophisticated frozen dessert in the world, but at least it’s not a Viennetta. That is the lowest of the low. Now take a look at my retro pudding trolley …

Jan said Viennetta (pictured) was considered the height of sophistication in the 1980s

A cylinder of vanilla ice-cream coated with raspberry sauce — not the strawberry specified in the BBC recipe — and entombed in a layer of sponge.

It was invented in the late 1950s by Dr Ernest Velden, a Czech lawyer who fled to the UK at the start of World War II. He set up an ice cream factory to manufacture his innovative dessert in Eastbourne, Sussex, in 1958.

Birds Eye bought Velden’s factory a few years later and Arctic Roll reached the peak of its popularity in the 1980s when the firm was making over 25 miles of the stuff each month, using a giant, 100ft-long oven.

Launched by custard powder company Bird’s in 1967, in a Strawberries and Cream flavour — classic Angel Delight has held its place on our supermarket shelves ever since. Made by whisking a sachet of dessert powder into cold milk. Left to set, it transforms into a sweet, sticky mousse. It was hugely popular in the 1970s — many have fond memories of the Butterscotch flavour, which is still available along with Banana, Chocolate and Strawberry versions.

£1.65/650ml from most supermarkets

With its sophisticated, continental-sounding name, Viennetta was originally launched by British ice cream company Wall’s from its Gloucester factory in 1982 as a one-off ‘posh’ Christmas dessert. The ice cream gateau with its concertina layers of wavy vanilla ice cream interleaved with crisp chocolate proved so popular that it became a year-round product.

Considered the height of sophistication in the 1980s, a decade later it was given thicker chocolate layers, and appeared in new flavours, including Mint, Strawberry, Cappuccino and Praline.

Jan claims Heinz discontinued their range of steamed sponge puddings (pictured) several years ago

Heinz Steamed Sponge Puddings

Tinned treacle sponge, Spotted Dick and Jam sponge pudding — just the kind of retro comfort food we could all do with.

Well, we hate to break this to you — but Heinz discontinued their range of tinned sponge puddings several years ago. And no, we had no idea either — and now we feel bereft.

Neapolitan Ice Cream brick

Jan revealed Neapolitan Ice Cream brick (pictured left) is still available in Tesco and Bird’s Strawberry Trifle Kit (pictured right) is sold in most UK supermarkets

Invented in the 19th century, this colourful, striped block of vanilla, chocolate and strawberry ice cream is another classic dessert that has stood the test of time. It was originally sold in oblong, cardboard cartons, which unfolded, to allow the ice cream to be sliced and served between two flat wafers. You can still buy the cardboard packages in Tesco, although plastic cartons of the soft scoop version are more widely available.

Bird’s Strawberry Trifle Kit

Recipes for trifle date back to the 1590s — and these days there are all kinds of sophisticated versions of this traditional British dessert to buy and make.

But if you want to be taken back to tea at grandma’s or the Sunday lunches of your childhood — a Bird’s trifle kit is the only way to go. A box of glorious retro sachets: jelly crystals custard powder dream topping (a white, creamy topping), chocolate sprinkles and sponge fingers.

It’s typical, space-age ‘instant’ food of the 1960s and 1970s. And you don’t have to bother making any stupid jam.


Video: Υμηττός: Βρέθηκε αυτοσχέδιος εμπρηστικός μηχανισμός (July 2022).


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