Traditional recipes

How Can You Tell If Your Olive Oil Is Counterfeit?

How Can You Tell If Your Olive Oil Is Counterfeit?


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

We hate to break it to you, but that might not be real olive oil on your salad

There's a lot of fraudulent extra virgin olive oil out there.

You may not realize it, but there’s a huge black market out there for counterfeit olive oil. In fact, reported on a recent episode of 60 Minutes, about 70 percent of all the olive oil you’ll encounter is inauthentic in some way. It’s all olive oil, for the most part; it’s just not extra virgin olive oil.

What’s the easiest way to tell if that bottle of extra virgin olive oil is counterfeit? The best thing to do is go to a specialty store and get your hands on the real deal, which usually sells for quite a bit more than what you find at supermarkets. Real extra virgin olive oil has a pronounced grassy, peppery smell and a slightly acidic flavor reminiscent of olives. If your store-bought oil smells waxy or slick, it’s probably not legit. It also shouldn’t be bright green; only super-fresh oils are green, so that color means that chlorophyll has been added. If you swirl it in a glass it should be more viscous than vegetable oil.

Real, high-quality extra virgin olive oil is a flavor bomb, and if you’ve never had it you most likely don’t even realize (pay attention to the oil that’s served with the bread the next time you go to a good Italian restaurant). If you’re just looking for something to cook with or use in salad dressings, then there’s no reason to spend $20 on a bottle of the really good stuff. But if you want something to drizzle over a pasta dish or fresh mozzarella, or to just enjoy with some rustic bread, then we suggest you go out of your way to track down real extra virgin olive oil. You’ll know it once you taste it.

Read our full investigation into olive oil fraud.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.


The Real Reason Your Olive Oil Is Probably Fake

There are healthy foods that taste awful and unhealthy foods that taste divine. Then there's authentic extra virgin olive oil, or as intimates refer it: EVOO — which tastes divine and boasts seemingly unlimited health benefits — if, indeed, it's authentic. Unfortunately, this is rarely the case.

Investigative journalist Tom Mueller is author of the whistleblowing classic Extra Virginity, which blew the lid off the olive oil trade by exposing how rampant it is with fraud. Mueller shocked America when he claimed to 60 Minutes that "around 75 to 80 percent" of extra virgin olive oils sold in the U.S. are fraudulent.

Olive oil fraud has been around for thousands of years. Cuneiform tablets found in Ebla testify to royal inspectors visiting olive mills to monitor olive oil production. Even in Homer's day, EVOO was treated like "liquid gold."

More recently, fraud has had life-threatening consequences. In the early 1960s, olive oil doctored with jet engine oil left 10,000 people in Morocco seriously ill. In 1981, over 20,000 people in Spain were poisoned from toxic rapeseed oil labelled as olive oil. Although today's frauds don't always have such dire consequences, they wreak havoc on economies, livelihoods, and the future of those who produce authentic EVOO — while competing against cheap fakes stealing their "extra virgin" legitimacy. As rising demand transforms EVOO into an increasingly valuable commodity and fraudsters find ingenious new ways of counterfeiting it, the reasons why your olive oil is probably fake continue to grow.